The Preface to the Aeneis of Virgil
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By Joseph Trapp 16 May, 2019
Excerpt From THE PREFACE. however Poetry may have been dishonored by the Follies of some, and the Vices of others; the Abuse, or Corruption of the best Things being always the worst: It will, notwithstanding, be ever regarded, as it ever has been,... Read more
Excerpt From THE PREFACE. however Poetry may have been dishonored by the Follies of some, and the Vices of others; the Abuse, or Corruption of the best Things being always the worst: It will, notwithstanding, be ever regarded, as it ever has been, by the wisest, and most judicious of Men, as the very Flower of human Thinking, the most exquisite Spirit that can be extracted from the Wit and Learning of Mankind. But I shall not now enter into a formal Vindication of this Divine Art from the many groundless Aspersions which have been cast upon it by Ignorance, and Ill-nature; nor display either it's Dignity in itself, or it's Usefulness both in Philosophy, and Religion; or the delightful Elegancy of its refined Ideas, and harmonious Expressions. This I have in some measure attempted in another Treatise; to which I rather choose to refer the Reader, than to repeat what I have already said, tho' in a different Language from This, in which I am now writing. I shall therefore only observe at present, that to hate, or despise Poetry, not only argues a Man deficient in Wisdom, and Learning; but even brings his Virtue and Goodness under Suspicion: What our Shakespear says of another melodious Science, being altogether as applicable to This; and Poetry it self being the Musick of Thoughts, and Words, as Musick is the Poetry of Sounds. The Man that hath not Musick in his Soul, And is not mov'd with Concord of sweet Sounds; Is fit for Treasons, Stratagems, and Spoils; The Motions of his Spirit are dull as Night, And his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such Man be trusted.—— And as Poetry was by the Heathen styled the Language of the Gods; much the same may be said by a Christian of the one true Deity: Since a great part of the Holy Scriptures themselves is to the last degree Poetical, both in Sentiments, and Diction. Less
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  • ISBN
  • 30
  • Public Domain Books
  • English
  • 9781500133610
Joseph Trapp (1679–1747) was an English clergyman, academic, poet, and pamphleteer. His production as a younger man of occasional verse (some anonymous, or in Latin) and dramas led to his appointmen...
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